Has something amazing happened in Singapore?

Kim told reporters that “the world will see a major change.”


On June 25, 1950, the Korean War began when some 75,000 soldiers from the North Korean People’s Army poured across the 38th parallel, the boundary between the Soviet-backed Democratic People’s Republic of Korea to the north and the pro-Western Republic of Korea to the south.

At first, the war was a defensive one–a war to get the communists out of South Korea–and it went badly for the Allies. The North Korean army was well-disciplined, well-trained and well-equipped; Rhee’s forces, by contrast, were frightened, confused, and seemed inclined to flee the battlefield at any provocation.

By the end of the summer, President Truman and General Douglas MacArthur, the commander in charge of the Asian theater, had decided on a new set of war aims. Now, for the Allies, the Korean War was an offensive one: It was a war to “liberate” the North from the communists.

Initially, this new strategy was a success. An amphibious assault at Inchon pushed the North Koreans out of Seoul and back to their side of the 38th parallel. But as American troops crossed the boundary and headed north toward the Yalu River, the border between North Korea and Communist China, Chinese leader Mao Zedong sent troops to North Korea and warned the United States to keep away from the Yalu boundary unless it wanted full-scale war

This was something that President Truman and his advisers decidedly did not want: They were sure that such a war would lead to Soviet aggression in Europe, the deployment of atomic weapons and millions of senseless deaths.

In July 1951, President Truman and his new military commanders started peace talks at Panmunjom. Still, the fighting continued along the 38th parallel as negotiations stalled. Both sides were willing to accept a ceasefire that maintained the 38th parallel boundary, but they could not agree on whether prisoners of war should be forcibly “repatriated.” (The Chinese and the North Koreans said yes; the United States said no.) Finally, after more than two years of negotiations, the adversaries signed an armistice on July 27, 1953. The agreement allowed the POWs to stay where they liked; drew a new boundary near the 38th parallel that gave South Korea an extra 1,500 square miles of territory; and created a 2-mile-wide “demilitarized zone” that still exists today.


The great general Eisenhower had been president for some 6 months when the fighting finally stopped. But an armistice is not a peace treaty, so the war actually never ended. It has remained a constant threat to world peace ever since and every attempt to "fix" the Korea problem has failed. Kennedy, Johnson, Nixon .. followed by Ford, Carter, Reagan .. followed by Bush, Clinton, Bush, Obama .. could not solve the puzzle.

Has something amazing happened in Singapore? As our president likes to say ..

 

 

FRED COSTELLO IS OUR NEXT CONGRESSMAN.

HE WILL SUPPORT, PROTECT AND DEFEND OUR PRESIDENT

 

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Paid for by Fred Costello for Congress, Republican, FL CD6


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